NICK BUTTER

RUNNING

The first and only man to run a marathon in every country in the world, UK athlete, adventurer, and motivational speaker Nick Butter gave up the office life 8 years ago and found the courage to jump into the world of running and adventure. to quote Nick "I was trapped behind a desk, and now I am not" Today Nick runs all over the world, living every day with gratitude, putting his body and mind to the test, and taking some amazing photography along the way.

STATS


Total Marathons: 196

Countries visited: 196

Expeditions: 4

Marathon Time: 02:53:57

Furthest distance: 351 Miles

Please tell us a bit about yourself and what you are currently training for

My name is Nick Butter, I am a British endurance athlete, motivational speaker, and author. I have just come back from running a marathon in every country in the world as of about 9 months ago. I set that world record and I was very proud of it, it took a lot of effort to get to the start line and even more effort to get to the finish line, and there was a hell of a lot of people involved. Since then, I’m on to the next challenge. Because of Corona virus we postponed our speaking tour to 2021, which is speaking tours to businesses, theatres, and schools all over the country and the rest of the world, in fact. We are now getting ready preparing for a couple of things, first of all is the Italian Grand Tour. This is my attempt to run from the most northerly point to the most southerly point of Italy, and this is going to be 100 marathons in 100 days. So that’s my next big thing and it's kind of a training mission for an even bigger thing happening in 2022/23 but that’s top secret at the moment.

How did you get introduced to your sport (what’s your athletic background)?

When I was very young, I was originally a skier, under 19 snow sports England team, I was a slalom skier. That was my dream, I always wanted to be in the Olympics as a skier. The reality of the situation is I had a few injuries and I also wasn’t good enough, and I was also getting old. Now I’m not old but the skiing age you get old at around 24 or 25 so by that time I was already kind of a bit late in the game, even though I started skiing very young. So skiing was a big thing, I loved tennis as a kid, badminton, pretty much any sport, cycling as well. I did run to keep fit, to go running with friends at school and cross-country events. And then I started to get into running when I ditched skiing and went into a real paying job in Finance, I used running as a bit of therapy. And so I got out of that because of running, I had the opportunity to do lots of ultra-events and marathons and I started doing quite well in them and I decided to make the jump into sport full time. I would say I am a slow plodder, I’m not going to be setting any records for the speed I run at, but I can certainly set records for how long I can run for, it’s all about the endurance with me.

What do you enjoy the most about your sport?

I think the calmness, the peace, and the access to adventure and alternative lifestyle that means I’m not working behind a desk. If you couple those two together, I think that’s pretty much what a lot of people are looking for and I’m very grateful to be able to do that. I’m very fortunate to be able to run, to have my health, have my family support me, my girlfriend support me, and a dog that loves to run, and I live in a van. It opens up a whole different world, a lot of people have a 9 – 5 or they spend a lot of their time basing their entire life around earning money therefore work and what I am trying to do is put the enjoyment first and hope that the money will come afterwards. It isn’t easy and you certainly don’t earn as much as if you had a proper job really unless you are an elite like Farrow or an Olympian. My kind of adventure running is all about the peace and the enjoyment. I love being in nature, in the mountains, and different climates, and as sadistic as it sounds, I quite like the suffering element of it because I like to challenge myself, to enjoy something it needs to be difficult. There’s a number of things that we’ve talked about doing and I get to it and I’m not motivated to do it because it’s not difficult enough, I enjoy it when it’s difficult

Who are the people you rely on to who help you perform?

I suppose that’s in two categories, I rely on my family, and my friends, and my team that enable me to have the life that I do in terms of running and the freedom that it gives and a lot of people doing a lot of stuff for me some of them for free, some of them paid but never a lot so I have to rely on very selfless lovely people, and of course my girlfriend and my family are similarly minded and they are very supportive in that way and they definitely help me perform mentally because they allow me to do it and don’t make me feel guilty for it which is something. The other side of it is the nutrition and health and physical performance. Obviously, Sidekick provides me with all my recovery needs and without that I certainly wouldn’t be able to do what I do long term and my body wouldn’t be happy with me. There’s a huge element there which that is very important, and those recovery tools are paramount to my success in all of my huge endurance expeditions. I’ve always been one for doing little recovery but the more and more you run, and the older you get you need to focus very much on it, so recovery is a key element to it. Similar to nutrition, you need to eat the right stuff and I’m well known for not eating the right stuff for too long but I’m starting to get better at that too.

What's your typical training day look like and what is your biggest challenge right now?

My typical training day is 10 miles in the morning and then anything else goes. I try and do my training in three weekly cycles, so I have an endurance week which is longer miles, I have a recovery week which is less miles and not fast at all, and then the third week is fast temp week so less miles but faster. So long miles, less miles, fast miles, and if you rotate those then that is a good area of training. In terms of the challenges most of the time in this lifestyle it's finance and it's logistics and obviously at the moment Corona virus in certain aspects, and ensuring the balance between the team and family and the whole relationship side is balanced because that’s such an important part of it, the reason that I do this life is because it's enjoyable and it's having an opportunity to be free and there is no point in doing it if your not going to have that so you have to make sure that your living in the moment and appreciating the now whilst also planning for the future which is always difficult.

What does it take to succeed at the highest levels in your sport?

I think it is a mixed bag of selfishness, and stubbornness, and frankly a lot of quite negative traits because it is very easy to give up when it gets difficult. I suppose you have to be very one track minded and know your goal at any cost, and sometime that can upset the bank, your family, the people around you, and can upset your body. I think you have to be relentless in your efforts to endure all of those to get to the end.

Tell me about a recent injury you've had and how you recovered?

I try to avoid injuries as everybody does, but I think there is a tendency for a lot of runners, they get too close to the injury and then it goes over the line and then injury happens. What I like to do is try and prevent it as opposed to react to it, so that’s being a little bit in touch with the body. To be honest I’ve been very lucky, I’ve had some torn fibres in my Achilles, I’ve had a very bad back, and naturally, my knees are quite sore but in order to help that you have to focus on the recovery more, so your talking about making sure you are scraping your muscles for long enough in the right places, and that your also giving a good balance of nutrition and rest and that helps to not only recovery from injuries but also prevent them too.

What’s the achievement you are most proud of?

I think it’s a safe assumption that everybody who knows me would say running a marathon in every country in the world is up there, but I am also quite proud of leaving the stability of my finance job because it's very easy to stay stuck in that world, and even if you are on a medium or “good” wage, let alone a high wage, it's very easy to be trapped by the money and the confines of social conformities, so I felt like I had good courage to make that step. I’m definitely proud of that, and certainly I’m proud of finishing the trip, but I certainly feel that was more of a team effort because had my team not been there I wouldn’t have done that myself so it's not just me that’s made that happen. So maybe the answer is individually I’m most proud of leaving the confines of my job.

How important is mental preparation to Competition & training, how do you prepare yours?

It is very important; I think endurance running is predominantly in the mind. There’s a lot of people out there that have done huge feats of endurance and had little to no physical background or legacy in their legs or in their body, whatever sport they’re doing, and I think that comes sometimes people do these great things coming out of injuries or horrible illness, for me I have to get my head around what’s to come and I have to make sure what I am doing I want to be doing. If you said go and run x, y, and z and If I didn’t want to do it and I wasn’t happy doing it then I wouldn’t get to the finish line. So, I have to have a lot of time, months of thought about the different scenarios of what if this happens, what if that happens and understand the realities of what the trip will be like. So if I’m running everyday if I’m sacrificing x, y, and z. am I okay with that, what the balance is like and I have to be able to want to getup and do it, and inevitably at some point or another that happens that you don’t want to get up, you don’t want to run, you don’t want to carry on, so then you have to have enough of those thoughts in the bank that you want to continue. So, I think mental preparation is huge, it's also quite individual and not necessarily entirely understood for everybody because it's so specific to each given moment and each given athlete, but it's huge for me.

How do you stay motivated?

I stay motivated quite easily because the alternative is not having an adventurous life, the alternative is not having the health and the freedom and the happiness and the opportunity that I have. Life is finite, we live for a certain amount of time and I’m doing what I love so the motivation is there

What’s it feel like to Win, what was been your favorite victory so far?

Might sound soppy, but I think my favorite victory isn’t sport related but with my girlfriend and my dog, and my home, and my life because a lot of people don’t have that, and I think I’ve certainly feel like I’ve won that. Running is my passion and my sport and my hobby and winning in those situations feels great but actually winning in a situation where now for life I have a perfect setup where I can be free, I can enjoy the world, I can travel, that certainly feels like winning.

What role does recovery play in your athletic success, how much time do you dedicate to it each week?

I think that has to be flexible, if I am running fast the recovery has to be slow and long, if I am running slow the recovery can be slightly quicker and therefore my sessions with the Sidekick tools are different, and obviously there are lots of points in the body that recover at different rates and in different ways. I dedicate as much time I think as necessary and in fairness probably not enough because I’m impatient and I think a lot of runners have the same thing, you want to just get you there and run and as soon as you start to feel a bit better you then jump at it again but sometimes you don’t have the option either, when I’m running huge days you do recover then you have to get back to it, so sometimes time and the expedition or the adventure forces your hand a bit.

Can you walk us through your recovery programming (PT, massage therapy, foam rolling etc..?)

There is no one set day of recovery everything is different, everything has to be flexible because there are too many variables, if I just ran over the Dolomites or the mountains (Like I’m about to to) then my calves and maybe my hips will be suffering because it's uneven so I’m going to have to be focusing on different areas. It’s the same with training and running, you have to have a good amount of quantity, but you also need a good amount of quality. You need to have quality running and quality recovery, whether it be foam rollers, scraping, simple massage, it's all dependent on the given situation.

What’s the best recovery tip you've ever received? 

I actually think it’s a controversial one but one of the great British ultrarunners said to me once
“if your legs are that bad, if your legs are really really sore, and your body is physically exhausted the best thing you can do is nothing” because your body needs to recuperate, and your body needs to sleep. Sleep is a huge part of recovery and without that, none of the other stuff is really worth it. You’re not going to see the gains from scraping and massage or foam rolling if you haven’t had enough sleep and let your body do its business. So certainly, doing nothing initially is a good idea.

What goals do you have for yourself for 2020/21?

For 2020 the last half of the year from September all the way through to Christmas I am running north to south of Italy, and also the goal is to organize the speaking tour, the theatre tour, speaking in schools for next year, and also progress some of the planning for the future trips. I set myself goals, I write them down every Christmas/new year time and this year I wrote that I wanted to run definitely a week worth of marathons, there’s 52 marathons in a year, and I wanted to get another record so hopefully we will be able to achieve that with this 100 marathons in 100 days running north to south in Italy and we are obviously going over some really great places as well. There’s an overarching one as well about just making sure I’m being present in the day.

What advice would you give other athletes looking to follow in your footsteps

Get a good pair of trainers maybe (literally), and I think patience, a good balance of patience and impatience, and the bigger picture of appreciating that what you may see from the outside of social media, and documentaries, and the book that’s the swan metaphor, that’s the pretty bit, the calm on the surface but there’s a hell of a lot of stuff that goes on in the background and there’s a lot of people that you have to rely on to help so it’s a big team effort and your certainly going to have to rely on a lot of people, and you have to sacrifice a lot of stuff and a lot of people that you love and admire and cherish are also going to have to sacrifice a lot of stuff. it's not always pretty but if you dig in and you keep your mind in the game and what you love to do, and make sure you always check yourself and that your checking that your happy day to day, that’s probably the best advice.

How can someone find out more about you?

Loads of options, the easiest one is nickbutter.com, or on Strava  at Nick Butter Running the World, or Instagram at nickbutterrun, Twitter at nickbutterrun, Facebook at running the world, or just simply google my name. You can also read the book if you like, just released the book “Running the world” about my latest expedition running a marathon in every country in the world. Penguin has published that and that is on the shelves as of the 11th of November.

What is your favorite Sidekick Tool and Why?

My favorite Sidekick tool (easy answer) is the small handheld Echo muscle scraper you can use it on your feet, you can use it on your legs, shoulders, arms, face if you wanted to. it's very easy to use and it fits in my bag, is always there and is always accessible.

What’s the best part about being a Sidekick Athlete?

Very simply it’s a good whole balance of a great product, good branding so it's easy to talk about, and I enjoy using, it's worth using along with a very good team of people behind it that know what they are doing and can advise me how to use them. The University side of the website, the learning part, the videos is more than 50% of the product because there is no point in recovery and using these devices if you're not using them properly, how many years have people been using foam rollers improperly? This way anybody who’s using the tools can use them and use them well.

"You’re not going to see the gains from scraping and massage or foam rolling if you haven’t had enough sleep and let your body do its business."

NICK'S FAVOURITE SIDEKICK TOOL

Echo Muscle Scraper

143 reviews

WHAT'S INSIDE THE SET

  • Echo Muscle Scraper
    Stainless Steel and Unbreakable, the Echo has all the benefits of the Curve but more.
  • Revive Emollient Spray
    Made from 100% natural ingredients, apply this lubricant prior to scraping.
  • Sidekick University
    Access over 40 Chiropractor & Physiotherapist led videos.
  • Carry Case
    Your Echo is an Investment, keep it protected at all times.
  • Cleaning Towel
    This towel is great for wiping off excess oil on your skin after-use.

WHAT'S INSIDE THE SET

(Save $10! Receive an additional $25 value for only $15 more.)

  • Echo Muscle Scraper
    Stainless steel and unbreakable, the Echo has all the benefits of the Curve but more.
  • Revive Emollient Spray
    Made from 100% natural ingredients, apply this lubricant prior to scraping.
  • Sidekick University
    Access over 40 Chiropractor & Physiotherapist led videos.
  • Carry Case - $20 value
    Your Echo is an Investment, keep it protected at all times.
  • Cleaning Towel - $5 value
    This towel is great for wiping off excess oil on your skin after-use.

STATS


Total Marathons: 196

Countries visited: 196

Expeditions: 4

Marathon Time: 02:53:57

Furthest distance: 351 Miles

NICK BUTTER

PROFESSIONAL RUNNER

The first and only man to run a marathon in every country in the world, UK athlete, adventurer, and motivational speaker Nick Butter gave up the office life 8 years ago and found the courage to jump into the world of running and adventure. to quote Nick "I was trapped behind a desk, and now I am not" Today Nick runs all over the world, living every day with gratitude, putting his body and mind to the test, and taking some amazing photography along the way.


Please tell us a bit about yourself and what you are currently training for

My name is Nick Butter, I am a British endurance athlete, motivational speaker, and author. I have just come back from running a marathon in every country in the world as of about 9 months ago. I set that world record and I was very proud of it, it took a lot of effort to get to the start line and even more effort to get to the finish line, and there was a hell of a lot of people involved. Since then, I’m on to the next challenge. Because of Corona virus we postponed our speaking tour to 2021, which is speaking tours to businesses, theatres, and schools all over the country and the rest of the world, in fact. We are now getting ready preparing for a couple of things, first of all is the Italian Grand Tour. This is my attempt to run from the most northerly point to the most southerly point of Italy, and this is going to be 100 marathons in 100 days. So that’s my next big thing and it's kind of a training mission for an even bigger thing happening in 2022/23 but that’s top secret at the moment.

How did you get introduced to your sport (what’s your athletic background)?

When I was very young, I was originally a skier, under 19 snow sports England team, I was a slalom skier. That was my dream, I always wanted to be in the Olympics as a skier. The reality of the situation is I had a few injuries and I also wasn’t good enough, and I was also getting old. Now I’m not old but the skiing age you get old at around 24 or 25 so by that time I was already kind of a bit late in the game, even though I started skiing very young. So skiing was a big thing, I loved tennis as a kid, badminton, pretty much any sport, cycling as well. I did run to keep fit, to go running with friends at school and cross-country events. And then I started to get into running when I ditched skiing and went into a real paying job in Finance, I used running as a bit of therapy. And so I got out of that because of running, I had the opportunity to do lots of ultra-events and marathons and I started doing quite well in them and I decided to make the jump into sport full time. I would say I am a slow plodder, I’m not going to be setting any records for the speed I run at, but I can certainly set records for how long I can run for, it’s all about the endurance with me.

What do you enjoy the most about your sport?

I think the calmness, the peace, and the access to adventure and alternative lifestyle that means I’m not working behind a desk. If you couple those two together, I think that’s pretty much what a lot of people are looking for and I’m very grateful to be able to do that. I’m very fortunate to be able to run, to have my health, have my family support me, my girlfriend support me, and a dog that loves to run, and I live in a van. It opens up a whole different world, a lot of people have a 9 – 5 or they spend a lot of their time basing their entire life around earning money therefore work and what I am trying to do is put the enjoyment first and hope that the money will come afterwards. It isn’t easy and you certainly don’t earn as much as if you had a proper job really unless you are an elite like Farrow or an Olympian. My kind of adventure running is all about the peace and the enjoyment. I love being in nature, in the mountains, and different climates, and as sadistic as it sounds, I quite like the suffering element of it because I like to challenge myself, to enjoy something it needs to be difficult. There’s a number of things that we’ve talked about doing and I get to it and I’m not motivated to do it because it’s not difficult enough, I enjoy it when it’s difficult

Who are the people you rely on to who help you perform?

I suppose that’s in two categories, I rely on my family, and my friends, and my team that enable me to have the life that I do in terms of running and the freedom that it gives and a lot of people doing a lot of stuff for me some of them for free, some of them paid but never a lot so I have to rely on very selfless lovely people, and of course my girlfriend and my family are similarly minded and they are very supportive in that way and they definitely help me perform mentally because they allow me to do it and don’t make me feel guilty for it which is something. The other side of it is the nutrition and health and physical performance. Obviously, Sidekick provides me with all my recovery needs and without that I certainly wouldn’t be able to do what I do long term and my body wouldn’t be happy with me. There’s a huge element there which that is very important, and those recovery tools are paramount to my success in all of my huge endurance expeditions. I’ve always been one for doing little recovery but the more and more you run, and the older you get you need to focus very much on it, so recovery is a key element to it. Similar to nutrition, you need to eat the right stuff and I’m well known for not eating the right stuff for too long but I’m starting to get better at that too.

What's your typical training day look like and what is your biggest challenge right now?

My typical training day is 10 miles in the morning and then anything else goes. I try and do my training in three weekly cycles, so I have an endurance week which is longer miles, I have a recovery week which is less miles and not fast at all, and then the third week is fast temp week so less miles but faster. So long miles, less miles, fast miles, and if you rotate those then that is a good area of training. In terms of the challenges most of the time in this lifestyle it's finance and it's logistics and obviously at the moment Corona virus in certain aspects, and ensuring the balance between the team and family and the whole relationship side is balanced because that’s such an important part of it, the reason that I do this life is because it's enjoyable and it's having an opportunity to be free and there is no point in doing it if your not going to have that so you have to make sure that your living in the moment and appreciating the now whilst also planning for the future which is always difficult.

What does it take to succeed at the highest levels in your sport?

I think it is a mixed bag of selfishness, and stubbornness, and frankly a lot of quite negative traits because it is very easy to give up when it gets difficult. I suppose you have to be very one track minded and know your goal at any cost, and sometime that can upset the bank, your family, the people around you, and can upset your body. I think you have to be relentless in your efforts to endure all of those to get to the end.

Tell me about a recent injury you've had and how you recovered?

I try to avoid injuries as everybody does, but I think there is a tendency for a lot of runners, they get too close to the injury and then it goes over the line and then injury happens. What I like to do is try and prevent it as opposed to react to it, so that’s being a little bit in touch with the body. To be honest I’ve been very lucky, I’ve had some torn fibres in my Achilles, I’ve had a very bad back, and naturally, my knees are quite sore but in order to help that you have to focus on the recovery more, so your talking about making sure you are scraping your muscles for long enough in the right places, and that your also giving a good balance of nutrition and rest and that helps to not only recovery from injuries but also prevent them too.

What’s the achievement you are most proud of?

I think it’s a safe assumption that everybody who knows me would say running a marathon in every country in the world is up there, but I am also quite proud of leaving the stability of my finance job because it's very easy to stay stuck in that world, and even if you are on a medium or “good” wage, let alone a high wage, it's very easy to be trapped by the money and the confines of social conformities, so I felt like I had good courage to make that step. I’m definitely proud of that, and certainly I’m proud of finishing the trip, but I certainly feel that was more of a team effort because had my team not been there I wouldn’t have done that myself so it's not just me that’s made that happen. So maybe the answer is individually I’m most proud of leaving the confines of my job.

How important is mental preparation to Competition & training, how do you prepare yours?

It is very important; I think endurance running is predominantly in the mind. There’s a lot of people out there that have done huge feats of endurance and had little to no physical background or legacy in their legs or in their body, whatever sport they’re doing, and I think that comes sometimes people do these great things coming out of injuries or horrible illness, for me I have to get my head around what’s to come and I have to make sure what I am doing I want to be doing. If you said go and run x, y, and z and If I didn’t want to do it and I wasn’t happy doing it then I wouldn’t get to the finish line. So, I have to have a lot of time, months of thought about the different scenarios of what if this happens, what if that happens and understand the realities of what the trip will be like. So if I’m running everyday if I’m sacrificing x, y, and z. am I okay with that, what the balance is like and I have to be able to want to getup and do it, and inevitably at some point or another that happens that you don’t want to get up, you don’t want to run, you don’t want to carry on, so then you have to have enough of those thoughts in the bank that you want to continue. So, I think mental preparation is huge, it's also quite individual and not necessarily entirely understood for everybody because it's so specific to each given moment and each given athlete, but it's huge for me.

How do you stay motivated?

I stay motivated quite easily because the alternative is not having an adventurous life, the alternative is not having the health and the freedom and the happiness and the opportunity that I have. Life is finite, we live for a certain amount of time and I’m doing what I love so the motivation is there

What’s it feel like to Win, what was been your favorite victory so far?

Might sound soppy, but I think my favorite victory isn’t sport related but with my girlfriend and my dog, and my home, and my life because a lot of people don’t have that, and I think I’ve certainly feel like I’ve won that. Running is my passion and my sport and my hobby and winning in those situations feels great but actually winning in a situation where now for life I have a perfect setup where I can be free, I can enjoy the world, I can travel, that certainly feels like winning.

What role does recovery play in your athletic success, how much time do you dedicate to it each week?

I think that has to be flexible, if I am running fast the recovery has to be slow and long, if I am running slow the recovery can be slightly quicker and therefore my sessions with the Sidekick tools are different, and obviously there are lots of points in the body that recover at different rates and in different ways. I dedicate as much time I think as necessary and in fairness probably not enough because I’m impatient and I think a lot of runners have the same thing, you want to just get you there and run and as soon as you start to feel a bit better you then jump at it again but sometimes you don’t have the option either, when I’m running huge days you do recover then you have to get back to it, so sometimes time and the expedition or the adventure forces your hand a bit.

Can you walk us through your recovery programming (PT, massage therapy, foam rolling etc..?)

There is no one set day of recovery everything is different, everything has to be flexible because there are too many variables, if I just ran over the Dolomites or the mountains (Like I’m about to to) then my calves and maybe my hips will be suffering because it's uneven so I’m going to have to be focusing on different areas. It’s the same with training and running, you have to have a good amount of quantity, but you also need a good amount of quality. You need to have quality running and quality recovery, whether it be foam rollers, scraping, simple massage, it's all dependent on the given situation.

What’s the best recovery tip you've ever received? 

I actually think it’s a controversial one but one of the great British ultrarunners said to me once
“if your legs are that bad, if your legs are really really sore, and your body is physically exhausted the best thing you can do is nothing” because your body needs to recuperate, and your body needs to sleep. Sleep is a huge part of recovery and without that, none of the other stuff is really worth it. You’re not going to see the gains from scraping and massage or foam rolling if you haven’t had enough sleep and let your body do its business. So certainly, doing nothing initially is a good idea.

What goals do you have for yourself for 2020/21?

For 2020 the last half of the year from September all the way through to Christmas I am running north to south of Italy, and also the goal is to organize the speaking tour, the theatre tour, speaking in schools for next year, and also progress some of the planning for the future trips. I set myself goals, I write them down every Christmas/new year time and this year I wrote that I wanted to run definitely a week worth of marathons, there’s 52 marathons in a year, and I wanted to get another record so hopefully we will be able to achieve that with this 100 marathons in 100 days running north to south in Italy and we are obviously going over some really great places as well. There’s an overarching one as well about just making sure I’m being present in the day.

What advice would you give other athletes looking to follow in your footsteps

Get a good pair of trainers maybe (literally), and I think patience, a good balance of patience and impatience, and the bigger picture of appreciating that what you may see from the outside of social media, and documentaries, and the book that’s the swan metaphor, that’s the pretty bit, the calm on the surface but there’s a hell of a lot of stuff that goes on in the background and there’s a lot of people that you have to rely on to help so it’s a big team effort and your certainly going to have to rely on a lot of people, and you have to sacrifice a lot of stuff and a lot of people that you love and admire and cherish are also going to have to sacrifice a lot of stuff. it's not always pretty but if you dig in and you keep your mind in the game and what you love to do, and make sure you always check yourself and that your checking that your happy day to day, that’s probably the best advice.

How can someone find out more about you?

Loads of options, the easiest one is nickbutter.com, or on Strava  at Nick Butter Running the World, or Instagram at nickbutterrun, Twitter at nickbutterrun, Facebook at running the world, or just simply google my name. You can also read the book if you like, just released the book “Running the world” about my latest expedition running a marathon in every country in the world. Penguin has published that and that is on the shelves as of the 11th of November.

What is your favorite Sidekick Tool and Why?

My favorite Sidekick tool (easy answer) is the small handheld Echo muscle scraper you can use it on your feet, you can use it on your legs, shoulders, arms, face if you wanted to. it's very easy to use and it fits in my bag, is always there and is always accessible.

What’s the best part about being a Sidekick Athlete?

Very simply it’s a good whole balance of a great product, good branding so it's easy to talk about, and I enjoy using, it's worth using along with a very good team of people behind it that know what they are doing and can advise me how to use them. The University side of the website, the learning part, the videos is more than 50% of the product because there is no point in recovery and using these devices if you're not using them properly, how many years have people been using foam rollers improperly? This way anybody who’s using the tools can use them and use them well.

"You’re not going to see the gains from scraping and massage or foam rolling if you haven’t had enough sleep and let your body do its business."

NICK'S FAVORITE SIDEKICK TOOL

Echo Muscle Scraper

143 reviews

WHAT'S INSIDE THE SET

  • Echo Muscle Scraper
    Stainless Steel and Unbreakable, the Echo has all the benefits of the Curve but more.
  • Revive Emollient Spray
    Made from 100% natural ingredients, apply this lubricant prior to scraping.
  • Sidekick University
    Access over 40 Chiropractor & Physiotherapist led videos.
  • Carry Case
    Your Echo is an Investment, keep it protected at all times.
  • Cleaning Towel
    This towel is great for wiping off excess oil on your skin after-use.

WHAT'S INSIDE THE SET

(Save $10! Receive an additional $25 value for only $15 more.)

  • Echo Muscle Scraper
    Stainless steel and unbreakable, the Echo has all the benefits of the Curve but more.
  • Revive Emollient Spray
    Made from 100% natural ingredients, apply this lubricant prior to scraping.
  • Sidekick University
    Access over 40 Chiropractor & Physiotherapist led videos.
  • Carry Case - $20 value
    Your Echo is an Investment, keep it protected at all times.
  • Cleaning Towel - $5 value
    This towel is great for wiping off excess oil on your skin after-use.

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